Why Digital Reading Is No Substitute for Print

Saturday, July 23, 2016

while short-and-to-the-point may be a good fit for digital consumption, it’s not the sort of reading likely to nurture the critical thinking we still talk about as a hallmark of university education.

https://newrepublic.com/article/135326/digital-reading-no-substitute-print

NEH Summer Institute @ OU








cas.ou.edu/application1


Confronting the Parasite Economy

Monday, July 18, 2016

The real economy delivers on the promise of capitalism.
The parasite economy relentlessly undermines it.
If, as many on the right are wont to do, we divide our nation into one of “makers” and “takers,” it’s not the working poor who deserve our derision, but the low-wage businesses that exploit them.

Nick Hanauer
May 16, 2016

http://prospect.org/article/confronting-parasite-economy

"Thoughts on Free Will and Commodity Relations" by Amy Dru Stanley

Sunday, July 10, 2016

"Unlike chattel slavery..., the commodification of free labor long had posed a problem in Anglo-American traditions of thought. At least a century before Thomas Jefferson famously derided manufactures in his 1787 Notes on the State of Virginia, wage labor had been associated with the hierarchies of the household and carried the stigma of dependence." ("Wages, Sin, and Slavery: Some Thoughts on Free Will and Commodity Relations", Amy Dru Stanley, Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer, 2004), pp. 279-288)

n the era of the American Founders, "Hirelings- no matter how voluntarily they put up their labor for sale or what the price they were paid- were considered not fully free. To be sure, the cash nexus, contract, and the play of the free market in labor eroded the personal relations of dominion and submission characteristic of the customary bonds of paternalism between the gentry and laboring people." ("Wages, Sin, and Slavery: Some Thoughts on Free Will and Commodity Relations", Amy Dru Stanley, Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer, 2004), pp. 279-288)

Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, plain folk, patricians, political theorists, and members of Parliament joined in expressing "hostility to the status of wage-labourer," according to Christopher Hill's classic study of the subject. For the hireling had lost his birthright, "that property in a man's own labour and person," which was the badge of a free man." ("Wages, Sin, and Slavery: Some Thoughts on Free Will and Commodity Relations", Amy Dru Stanley, Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Summer, 2004), pp. 279-288)

I teach them all the good I can, and recommend them to others from whom I think they will get some moral benefit. And the treasures that the wise men of old have left us in their writings I open and explore with my friends. If we come on any good thing, we extract it, and we set much store on being useful to one another. - Socrates, Memorabilia
 
 
 
What we maintain is that in none of the problems of life can men afford to lose sight of the storehouse bequeathed to them by the ancients. In the complexus of everything which differentiates man from the brute creation, the voice of antiquity must be heard...

-H. Browne, quoted in "Classics and Citizenship" The Classical Quarterly, 1920